Sunday, February 18, 2018

Dwelling with You - James Murnane. Installation Views.

Dwelling with You - James Murnane
Greenwood Street Project
Photography : André Piguet

Installation view 
(Left)A heart, 2017, Acrylic on carved Japanese Magnolia, 30x20cm.
 Dans le ciel et sur la terre, 2018, Acrylic on carved Japanese Magnolia, 30x20cm.



Installation View
(left to right)L’astre d’en haut, 2018, Acrylic on carved Japanese Magnolia, 30x20cm.
You need not strive, 2018, Acrylic on carved Japanese Magnolia, 30x20cm.
A heart, 2017, Acrylic on carved Japanese Magnolia, 30x20cm.


Installation View
Il tient en main, 2018, Acrylic on rope, twine, screws, glass and Japanese Magnolia, dimensions variable.
On Floor
Becoming flesh, 2018, Acrylic on purpleheart, 6x29x28.5cm.


Becoming flesh, 2018, Acrylic on purpleheart, 6x29x28.5cm.

Il tient en main, 2018, Acrylic on rope, twine, screws, glass and Japanese Magnolia, dimensions variable.

L’astre d’en haut, 2018, Acrylic on carved Japanese Magnolia, 30x20cm.

You need not strive, 2018, Acrylic on carved Japanese Magnolia, 30x20cm.

Detail, A heart, 2017, Acrylic on carved Japanese Magnolia, 30x20cm.

Detail, A heart, 2017, Acrylic on carved Japanese Magnolia, 30x20cm.

Detail, Il tient en main, 2018, Acrylic on rope, twine, screws, glass and Japanese Magnolia, dimensions variable.


Detail, Il tient en main, 2018, Acrylic on rope, twine, screws, glass and Japanese Magnolia, dimensions variable.

Detail, Il tient en main, 2018, Acrylic on rope, twine, screws, glass and Japanese Magnolia, dimensions variable.



Dans le ciel et sur la terre, 2018, Acrylic on carved Japanese Magnolia, 30x20cm.

A heart, 2017, Acrylic on carved Japanese Magnolia, 30x20cm.



Wednesday, February 7, 2018

Dwelling with You - James Murnane


Like vapours from a thurible, Murnane’s iridescent veils of paint swell and diffuse amorphously. The wood grain is visible through these spare gestures of thin application, its whorls and striations acquiring a likeness to curling smoke too. It is as though surface and mark are harmonising to describe a breath passing over the horizon from abstraction to figuration. Murnane’s paintings borrow from the idiom of Abstract Expressionism in an antiphon to the corpus of Christian iconography.

Responding to the interaction of the edges of the paint and the shapes in the woodgrain, Murnane incises the surface with finely carved lines filled with gold paint. Though they trace and intensify nascent forms, these marks don’t grasp after discernible figures or try and wrest from the painted surface something legible as depiction. Murnane’s practice reverses the order of traditional icon painting techniques: the drawing or graph doesn’t precede and anticipate the application of colour but rather responds to it. 

In these paintings, I see intimations of feathers, arcs sketched by limbs in unfettered motion, and the shiver of ruffled wings. It is as though the spectral figures that I entertain have escaped circumscription and left broken, golden scratches of incomplete outlines. Something intangible is coming or going on this surface. Murnane’s use of iridescent pigments further amplifies this sense of an ephemeral ‘seeing’: they allow ambient light to render shifting hues and reflections on the surface as one moves around the work. The heavy, formal intransigence of traditional Christian icons is relieved and breaks into a coruscant flutter of movement. 

Murnane’s paintings seem to me to image the quickening of the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit is the agent of the Trinity that synthesises duality. It sets the relation between oppositional terms into motion like a spinning coin, such that these terms become constitutive of one another. The archetypal instance of this is flesh and soul, which the Holy Spirit renders in mutuality. The Holy Spirit also permits the relation of the image to its referent. What is immanent in the icon is its potential to unfold before the gaze and open upon the ground of its own possibility. For Christian iconography, that possibility of sacred imaging at all is established in the life of Christ, who is the incarnate image of God. Just as a human is not a soul poured into a container of flesh, Murnane’s paintings expose that icons are not just the addition of line and colour which delivers the ‘solution’ of a figure.  When Murnane stirs the order of line and colour in his lambent compositions, he reveals the operation of model and image inhering in one another that is proper to the icon. His work serves to refresh the viewer’s experience of iconographic images by adducing and transmitting a pétillance from underneath the reified conventions of traditional iconography.


Ann Debono, January 2018

Friday, August 19, 2016

WINK! The translations of the sonnet.

L’Idole
Sonnet du Trou du Cul
Arthur Rimbaud et Paul Verlaine 1871-72
Obscur et froncé comme un œillet violet
Il respire, humblement tapi parmi la mousse
Humide encor d’amour qui suit la fuite douce
Des Fesses blanches jusqu’au cœur de son ourlet.

Des filaments pareils à des larmes de lait
Ont pleuré, sous le vent cruel qui les repousse,
À travers de petits caillots de marne rousse
Pour s’aller perdre où la pente les appelait.

Mon Rêve s’aboucha souvent à sa ventouse ;
Mon âme, du coït matériel jalouse,
En fit son larmier fauve et son nid de sanglots.

C’est l’olive pâmée, et la flûte caline ;
C’est le tube où descend la céleste praline :
Chanaan féminin dans les moiteurs enclos !

The Idole,
Sonnet of an Arsehole
Crouching and pleated like a violet/eyelet
It breathes, modestly nestled in the moss,
still moist with love's trail of gentle loss
flowing down snowy flanks to its flowery heart.

Trickles, like tears of milky rope,
are wept on the cruel wind that propels them
through the little clots of the russet fen
to be lost down the beckoning slope

My dreams kiss often its wet cup
My soul, jealouse of its ability to fuck
Made of it a nest of tears, a musky duct

It is the swooning date and the caressing flute
it is the tube where descends the celestial fruit
A feminine promised land in moistness shut

Translation by Adrienne Gaha 2016

The Idole,
Sonnet of an Arsehole
Obscur and creased like a violet carnation
He breathes, in humble crawl among the moss
Love moist following the soft escape
From white curves in the heart of its hem

Filaments resembling milky tears
Have wept under the cruel wind rebuking
Through small clots of reddish marl
To be later found lost in the slope calling

My Dream often clenched to its sucker
My soul, material coit jaleousing
Made him its fawn lacrum and its nest of sobbing

The olive is swooning and the flute caressing
The tube in which descends the celeste praline
Feminine canaan locked in moisture enclosure

Translation by Celine Jeanne 2016

Sonnet du Trou du Cul (redux)
Cryptic and creased this purple whorl,
Exhales, hidden humble amongst airy moss
Still damp from soft flights of love
Pale orbs tilting into the lips of its heart.

Milky tears as filaments
Wept, the cruel wind impels them away
Across the small earthy clumps,
To lose themselves where the dunes' slopes beckon.

My dream has oft supped at this lacuna;
My soul jealous of such corporeal exchange,
Wild tears in this nest of wails.

An olive swooning, a beckoning flute
The rush where descends a celestial treat:
Over-flowing feminine banquet, in secret musty cellars!


Translation by Gabrielle Longmate 2016

Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Wink! Installation View

Left to right{rear wall}
MATTHEW HARRIS
Blossoms 2016
Acrylic on canvas
91 x 61 x 4 cm
CELIA HEMPTON
James, 2015
Oil on panel
35 x 30 cm
Courtesy of the Hayman Collection

left to right
LESLIE WAYNE
What Goes In, 2000
Oil on Wood 
14 x 12 x 2.5 inches
Private Collection
ANDREW BROWNE
Prada & ply 2016
Charcoal on Arches paper
94 x 60  cm
GILES RYDER
Space Doughnut (gold) 2008
Perspex, MDF, Builders Foam, Enamel Paint
23 x 50.5 x 50.5 cm
Private Collection


left to right
MATTHEW HARRIS
Blossoms 2016
Acrylic on canvas
91 x 61 x 4 cm
CELIA HEMPTON
James, 2015
Oil on panel
35 x 30 cm
Courtesy of the Hayman Collection
LESLIE WAYNE
What Goes In, 2000
Oil on Wood 
14 x 12 x 2.5 inches
Private Collection


installation
RUTH O’LEARY
History of painting, 2013
Single channel HD digital video, colour, sound.
4:03 minutes

https://vimeo.com/63989706


Special thanks to Adrienne Gaha, Celine Jeanne and Gabrielle Longmate for their considerable acumen and enthusiasm applied to the translations of L'Idole


left ANDREW BROWNE
Prada and ply 2016
Charcoal on Arches paper
94 x 60  cm
GILES RYDER
Space Doughnut (gold) 2008
Perspex, MDF, Builders Foam, Enamel Paint
23 x 50.5 x 50.5 cm
Private Collection


Monday, August 8, 2016

Saturday, May 28, 2016

Snake Dance -Adrienne Gaha

Installation View- Snake Dance _ Adrienne Gaha
Adrienne Gaha is represented by Kalli Rolfe Contemporary Art in Melbourne.


“Orpheus and the Animals’ [after Hans Leu], 2016
Oil on canvas, 153cm x 117cm.

“Seated Nude’ 2016
Oil on linen,76cm x 60cm.

Detail of "Detail ‘Bacchanalian Reveller’ [after Titian]", 2016
Oil on linen, 123cm x 97cm. 

Detail ‘Bacchanalian Reveller’ [after Titian], 2016
Oil on linen, 123cm x 97cm. 
Installation View (clockwise from top). 
Male Nude,[raw umber], 2016
Oil on canvas, 65cm x 95cm.
‘Sphinx’, 2016
Oil on linen. 40cm x 30cm.
‘Aisha Kandisha’, 2016
Oil on canvas, 50cm x 60 cm.


‘Sphinx’, 2016
Oil on linen. 40cm x 30cm.
Detail:
‘Sphinx’, 2016
Oil on linen. 40cm x 30cm.
‘Black Venus’ [after Norman Lindsay], 2016
Oil on linen, 40cm x 30cm.
“Actaeon’ 2016
Oil on canvas,153cm x 122cm.
Installation View (rear wall, left to right)
Black Venus’ [after Norman Lindsay], 2016
Oil on linen, 40cm x 30cm.
“Actaeon’ 2016
Oil on canvas,153cm x 122cm.
Male Nude,[raw umber], 2016
Oil on canvas, 65cm x 95cm.
‘Aisha Kandisha’, 2016
Oil on canvas, 50cm x 60 cm.


Installation View:
(rear wall clockwise from top)
‘Water Through Trees’ [after Albert Hanson], 2016
 Oil on canvas, 50cm x 60cm.
“Orpheus and the Animals’ [after Hans Leu], 2016
Oil on canvas, 153cm x 117cm.
Detail ‘Bacchanalian Reveller’ [after Titian], 2016
Oil on linen, 123cm x 97cm. 
‘Water Through Trees’ [after Albert Hanson], 2016
 Oil on canvas, 50cm x 60cm.